Skip to main content

International Fine Print Dealers Association (IFPDA) Fair Spring 2021 Online Edition

May 14, 2021 – May 28, 2021

An online fair featuring works by Josef Albers, Tara Donovan, Peter Downsbrough, Jenny Holzer, Ellsworth Kelly, Sol LeWitt, Robert Mangold, Brice Marden, Liliana Porter, Kay Rosen, Richard Serra, Lorna Simpson, Kiki Smith, and Sarah Sze

Established in 1987, the IFPDA is recognized as the world’s pre-eminent organization for fine art prints with 150 members vetted for the highest level of quality, value, and professionalism.

Works In Exhibition

Dark Gray Curve

Ellsworth Kelly Dark Gray Curve 1988 Two color lithograph on Arches Cover paper

Image/paper size:  26 x 84 inches  (66 x 213.4 cm)
Frame size:  28 7/8 x 86 7/8 inches  (73.3 x 220.7 cm)
Edition of 25
Signed “Kelly’ and numbered lower right in graphite
(Inventory #28319)

Interlinear N 65

Josef Albers Interlinear N 65 1962 Zinc plate lithograph

Image size: 18 3/4 x 24 inches (47.6 x 61 cm)
Paper size: 22 x 30 inches (55.9 x 76.2 cm)
Edition of 10
(Inventory #19033)

Untitled

Tara Donovan Untitled 2015 Relief print from a Slinky® matrix on paper with deckled edges

Image/paper size:  42 x 56 1/2 inches  (106.7 x 143.5 cm)
Edition of 25, 5 AP
Signed and dated lower right, numbered lower left in graphite
(Inventory #27842)

Six Geometric Figures & All Their Combinations (in pairs)

Sol LeWitt Six Geometric Figures & All Their Combinations (in pairs) 1980 Set of fifteen black and white silkscreen prints

Edition of 10, 5 AP
Image size:  10 x 17 1/2 inches each  (25.4 x 44.5 cm each)
Paper size:  11 1/2 x 19 inches each   (29.2 x 48.3 cm each)
Signed lower right on each sheet
(Inventory #29126)
Krakow 1980.02.07 – Krakow 1980.02.21

View Artwork

Untitled C

Robert Mangold Untitled C 1995 One from a set of three black and white etching and aquatints

Image/paper size:  22 3/4 x 30 3/4 inches  (57.8 x 78.1 cm)
Edition of 30Signed lower right, numbered lower left
(Inventory #28373)

Untitled

Brice Marden Untitled 1973 Etching on Rives BFK paper

Edition of 50
Image size: 27 3/8 x 19 1/4 inches (69.5 x 48.9 cm)
Paper size: 39 7/8 x 29 3/8 inches (101.3 x 74.6 cm)
Frame size: 49 3/4 x 39 inches (126.4 x 99.1 cm)
Signed and dated lower right, numbered lower left in graphite
(Inventory #31493)

View Artwork

Ripe Fruit Falling

Sarah Sze Ripe Fruit Falling 2012 Laser cut silkscreened paper, hand painted pebbles (black), two pieces of hand painted string (two pebbles attached) with five plastic blue push pins

Approximately 75 x 20 x 3/4 inches (190.5 x 50.8 x 1.9 cm)
Edition of 18, 6 AP, 4 PP
Signed on reverse
(Inventory #27870)

Dreamer

Liliana Porter Dreamer 2013 Woodcut on somerset satin, white, with satin pillow

Edition of 29
Image size: 25 x 19 inches (63.5 x 48.3 cm)
Paper size: 30 1/8 x 22 1/4 inches (76.5 x 56.5 cm)
Signed and dated lower right, titled lower center and numbered lower left
(Inventory #31547)

In Lieu of Louis (1789 – 1870), A True Story From the List Series

Kay Rosen In Lieu of Louis (1789 – 1870), A True Story From the List Series 1989/1996 Screenprint on paper

Image/paper size: 13 5/8 x 16 inches (34.6 x 40.6 cm)
Edition of 16
Signed, dated and numbered on verso
(Inventory #28775)

View Artwork

The List Portfolio (Ugly Duckling, Homophonia, Liszt, Liste/List)

Kay Rosen The List Portfolio (Ugly Duckling, Homophonia, Liszt, Liste/List) 1990 Set of four screenprints

Image/paper size: 30 1/8 x 22 1/2 inches each (76.5 x 57.2 cm each)

1) Ugly Duckling – a found list of names selected from the S section of the Gary, Indiana telephone book.  The names are all quite ungraceful sounding, until the 27th one, Swan.

2) List/Liste – a list of French and English words.  Liste, the French words, look like English words.  The second part, List, is the English translation of the French Liste, which of course also look like English words.

3) Liszt – a list of all of Franz Liszt’s works

4) Homophonia – a list of words identified by the artist that each contain a pair of identical looking and sounding letters, homophonic in other words.  Just one letter away from homophobia, Homophonia is a little verbal metaphor for the larger society and the importance of like components to structure and meaning.

Edition of 25
Signed, titled, dated and numbered in pencil on verso
(Inventory #23232)

View Artwork

Time As

Peter Downsbrough Time As 2001 Set of two lithographs

Edition of 25
Signed and dated on a certificate
Image/Paper size:  11 1/4 x 23 7/8 inches each  (28.6 x 60.6 cm each)
(Inventory #20472)

To Bobby Sands

Richard Serra To Bobby Sands 1981 One-color Lithograph on Arches cover paper

Image/paper size: 60 x 40 inches (152.4 x 101.6 cm)
Edition of 14, 5 AP
Signed, dated, and numbered lower right in graphite
(Inventory #30430)

Untitled

Lorna Simpson Untitled 1993 Photogravure with screenprint and hand additions in watercolor

Edition of 53, 10 AP
Left image/plate size: 28 7/8 x 21 9/16 inches (73.3 x 54.8 cm)
Right image/plate size: 28 7/8 x 16 inches (73.3 x 40.6 cm)
Overall image/plate size: 28 7/8 x 39 3/4 inches (73.3 x 101 cm)
Paper size: 35 1/2 x 45 1/2 inches (90.2 x 115.6 cm)
Frame size: 37 3/4 x 47 3/4 inches (95.9 x 121.3 cm)
Initialed and dated lower right, numbered lower left, recto
The accompanying text reads, “What should fit here is an oblique story about absence, but I can’t remember the short version.”
(Inventory #31809)

The text at the bottom of the piece reads, “What should fit here is an oblique story about absence, but I can’t remember the short version.”

In this work by Lorna Simpson, a photograph of a pair of a woman’s empty dress shoes standing on a specific but unidentifiable floor is juxtaposed with the pedals of an old upright piano situated in an unidentifiable and light-less space. Simpson’s addition of watercolor to the shoes could reference the human touch in the subject matter or the tradition of hand-tinting in nineteenth-century photographs. Both of these perhaps suggest a narrative engaging familial history and/or loss. Below the image, Simpson has printed an intentionally open-ended text that reads, “What should fit here is an oblique story about absence, but I can’t remember the short version.” By leaving so much open-ended, Simpson reminds the viewer that even the seemingly familiar is more complicated than one initially assumes.

Simpson is well known for her work that addresses issues ranging from race and sexuality, to ideas of the body, to interpersonal communication and relationships. She has been inspired by various sources, including personal experience, the current political climate, and African-American culture and history.

View Artwork

Untitled (Earth Print)

Kiki Smith Untitled (Earth Print) 1997 Lithograph on Gampi-shi paper

Image/paper size: 25 3/4 x 56 1/2 inches (65.4 x 143.5 cm)
Edition of 20
Signed and dated lower right, numbered lower left in graphite
(Inventory #30625)

View Artwork

Money Creates Taste from Truisms, 1977-79

Jenny Holzer Money Creates Taste from Truisms, 1977-79 2004 Glass paperweight multiple engraved with the words "Money Creates Taste"

Edition of 90, 10 AP
3 x 3 inches  (7.6 x 7.6 cm)
Accompanied with a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist
(Inventory #31848)

“Money Creates Taste”, functionally, is a glass paperweight. It incorporates one of Jenny Holzer’s “Truisms” (1977-79), which she wrote to resemble existing truisms, maxims, and clichés. Each Truism distills difficult and contentious ideas into a seemingly straightforward fact. Privileging no single viewpoint, the “Truisms” examine the social construction of beliefs, mores, and truths all while questioning issues of fact, narrative and viewpoint.

The “Truisms” first were shown on anonymous street posters that were wheat-pasted throughout downtown Manhattan, and subsequently have appeared on T-shirts, hats, electronic signs, stone floors, projections and benches, among other supports. As for this specific piece, the words are etched in glass and get warped as one looks at them.  This visual alteration of the words gives a viewer a sense that the statement is not quite “true”. Furthermore, looking at the form of a paperweight, the text is actually meant to hold things down, which is not always a good thing.

For more than forty years, Jenny Holzer has presented her astringent ideas, arguments, and sorrows in public places and international exhibitions, including 7 World Trade Center, the Venice Biennale, the Guggenheim Museums in New York and Bilbao, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Louvre Abu Dhabi. Her medium, whether formulated as a T-shirt, a plaque, or an LED sign, is writing, and the public dimension is integral to the delivery of her work. Starting in the 1970s with the New York City posters, and continuing through her recent light projections on landscape and architecture, her practice has rivaled ignorance and violence with humor, kindness, and courage. Holzer received the Leone d’Oro at the Venice Biennale in 1990, the World Economic Forum’s Crystal Award in 1996, and the Barnard Medal of Distinction in 2011. She holds honorary degrees from Williams College, the Rhode Island School of Design, The New School, and Smith College. She lives and works in New York.

View Artwork